Archive | October, 2011

Wanna-Be Domestic Goddess Takes A Shortcut

21 Oct

On Monday, my new friend Susan came to my house for lunch – and she brought me a gift!  A wonderful, thoughtful gift: How to Be A Domestic Goddess, by Nigella Lawson.  Apparently, I am not the only one out there striving to achieve Domestic Goddessness.

Cover of "HOW TO BE A DOMESTIC GODDESS: B...

Cover via Amazon

According to Ms. Lawson, being a Domestic Goddess means learning to bake what she calls Comfort Food and I call The Kiss of Death for Weight Control: desserts.  In her table of contents, Ms. Lawson has a chapter titled “Desserts,” which implies that other chapters will cover other types of foods but that is misleading because the whole book is about how to bake yummy sweet things.  For example, there is another chapter titled “Children,” but it is NOT about how to bake children; it is about to bake yummy sweet things with the HELP of your children.

I do not bake yummy sweet things.  I try very hard not to have any yummy sweet things in my house, except on Friday nights when we have Shabbat dinner, and then I buy whatever bakery-made sweet treat I think I will best be able to resist eating.  And then I eat it anyway.

I would bake yummy sweet things, except for two main problems.  The first, as I hinted at above, is that when yummy sweet things are available, I eat them.  Baking them makes them available.  The second problem is that baking something yummy and sweet takes a lot more time and effort than tossing a bakery-made chocolate babka into my grocery cart.

But as I gazed upon Nigella Lawson’s beautiful book, I thought how nice it would be to be a yummy-sweet-treat-baking domestic goddess.  I imagined greeting my children in the morning with warm muffins, fresh from the oven.  Wouldn’t their day be better if it started with a made-from-scratch scone or slice of banana bread, rather than a 67-ingredient foil-wrapped power bar?

So I did what any Wanna Be Domestic Goddess would do: I took a shortcut.  I bought frozen chocolate croissants that could be baked up fresh.  They had to be good – they were made in France! Then I got up five minutes earlier than usual in the morning to preheat the oven and “bake” two croissants.  The croissants filled the kitchen with a warm, freshly-baked aroma, I felt like a domestic goddess, and I even got a “thanks” from my son.

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